Angiogenesis pp 291-305 | Cite as

Quantitative Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Formation in Vivo and in Vitro

  • E. Papadimitriou
  • B. R. Unsworth
  • M. E. Maragoudakis
  • P. I. Lelkes
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 263)


Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, is a fundamental process, essential in both health situations, such as reproduction, development and wound repair, as well as in diseases, such as tumor growth, diabetes and arthritis. In the first case, angiogenesis is highly regulated, i.e. turned on for brief periods of time and then completely inhibited. In the latter case, angiogenesis is persistent and unregulated.


Endothelial Cell Basal Lamina Chorioallantoic Membrane Vessel Development Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Papadimitriou
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. R. Unsworth
    • 1
  • M. E. Maragoudakis
    • 2
  • P. I. Lelkes
    • 3
  1. 1.Dept of BiologyMarquette UniversityMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Dept of PharmacologyUniversity of PatrasGreece
  3. 3.Milwaukee Clinical CampusUniversity of WI Medical SchoolMilwaukeeUSA

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