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Angiogenesis pp 265-269 | Cite as

Anti-Tumor Effects of GBS Toxin are Caused by Induction of a Targeted Inflammatory Reaction

  • Carl G. Hellerqvist
  • Gary B. Thurman
  • Bruce A. Russell
  • David L. Page
  • Gerald E. York
  • Yue-Fen Wang
  • Carlos Castillo
  • Hakan W. Sundell
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 263)

Abstract

Group B Streptococcus is a major pathogen in hospital nurseries in the United States affecting 10,000 neonates each year with the mortality rate of approximately 15%. GBS pneumonia, often called early onset disease, presents with signs of sepsis, granulocytopenia, and respiratory distress and is characterized by pulmonary hypertension and increased vascular permeability and proteinaceous pulmonary edema. After treatment with antibiotic, the neonate is cured of the infection but the symptoms of early onset disease persist which suggests the involvement of an extracellular toxin similar to gram-negative endotoxin shock. These observations led us to analyze both bacteria and media components which could be responsible for the induction of respiratory distress in the neonate.

Keywords

Nude Mouse Tumor Vasculature Early Onset Disease Endothelial Receptor Extracellular Toxin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl G. Hellerqvist
    • 1
  • Gary B. Thurman
    • 1
  • Bruce A. Russell
    • 1
  • David L. Page
    • 2
  • Gerald E. York
    • 1
  • Yue-Fen Wang
    • 1
  • Carlos Castillo
    • 1
  • Hakan W. Sundell
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PathologyVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of PediatricNeonatology Vanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA

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