Advertisement

Angiogenesis pp 233-240 | Cite as

Fibrin Degradative Pathways and Angiogenesis in Healing, Atherosclerosis and Tumour Invasion

  • W. Douglas Thompson
  • Chris M. Stirk
  • Andrew J. Keating
  • Allyson Reid
  • Elspeth B. Smith
  • W. T. Melvin
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 298)

Abstract

Fibrin fragment E has been shown by us to be the component of fibrin degradation products (FDP) active in stimulating angiogenesis (1, 2). It is abundant in the healing wound (3), proliferative atherosclerotic plaques (4) and breast cancer (5). It is both a thrombin and plasmin dependant product, and stimulates cell proliferation in culture in serum rich medium in contrast with thrombin itself which requires serum free medium (6). We have attempted to study and locate the active site on this 35–40 kD molecule by various blocking antibody approaches. Fibrinogen is a highly conserved molecule, and this results in species similarity problems that confound conventional approaches. The mouse will not respond with antibodies to human fragment E, although it will to fragment D, the other major constituent of FDP. The rabbit and the rat will produce polyclonal antibodies against E that block the angiogenic effect of FDP.

Keywords

Phage Clone Fibrin Degradation Product Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane Reactive Clone Orbital Incubator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Thompson WD, Campbell R, Evans AT. Fibrin degradation and angiogenesis: quantitative analysis of the angiogenic response in the chick chorioallantoic membrane. J Pathol 1985; 145: 27–37.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Thompson WD, Smith EB, Stirk CM, Marshall FI, Stout AJ, Kocchar A. Angiogenic activity of fibrin degradation products is located in fibrin fragment E. J Pathol 1992; 168:47–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Thompson WD, Harvey JA, Kazmi MA, Stout AJ. Fibrinolysis and angiogenesis in wound healing. J Pathol 1991; 165: 311–318.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    C.M Stirk, A Kochhar, E B Smith, W D Thompson. Presence of growth-stimulating fibrin degradation products containing fragment E in human atherosclerotic plaques. Atherosclerosis 1993; 103: 159–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Thompson WD, Wang JEH, Wilson SJ, Ganesalingam N. Angiogenesis and fibrin degradation in human breast cancer. In: Angiogenesis: Molecular Biology, Clinical Aspects. ME Maragoudakis et al, (eds), pp 245–252. Plenum Press, New York 1994.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Naito M, Sabally K, Thompson WD, Stirk CM, Smith EB, Benjamin N. Stimulation of proliferation of smooth muscle cells in culture by fibrin degradation products. Fibrinolysis 1996; 10 supp 4: 12 (Abs).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Thompson WD, Smith EB, Stirk CM, Seath J, McNally SJ, McCallion DSE, Melvin WT, Gaffney PJ. Fibrin in macrophages in inflammation and atherosclerotic plaques. Fibrinolysis 1996; 10 supp 4: 121.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Scott JK, and Smith GP. Searching for peptide ligands with an epitope library. Science 1990; 249: 186–390.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Parmley SF, and Smith GP. Antibody-selectable filamentous Fd phage vectors -affinity purification of target genes. Gene 1988; 73: 305–318.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Thompson WD, Brown FL Measurement of angiogenesis: mode of action of histamine in the chick chorioallantoic membrane is indirect. Int J Microcirc 1987; 6: 343–357.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Thompson WD, Smith EB, Stirk CM, Wang J. Fibrin degradation products in growth stimulatory extracts of pathological lesions. Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis 1993; 4: 113–116.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Thompson WD, McNally SJ, Ganesalingam N, McCallion DSE, Stirk CM, Melvin WT. Wound healing, fibrin and angiogenesis. In: Molecular, Cellular and Clinical Aspects of Angiogenesis. Ed M Maragoudakis, Plenum Press, New York, 1996. pp 161–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Douglas Thompson
    • 1
  • Chris M. Stirk
    • 2
  • Andrew J. Keating
    • 2
  • Allyson Reid
    • 1
  • Elspeth B. Smith
    • 1
  • W. T. Melvin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Pathology, Aberdeen Royal InfirmaryUniversity of Aberdeen Medical SchoolAberdeenUK
  2. 2.Departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Aberdeen Royal InfirmaryUniversity of Aberdeen Medical SchoolAberdeenUK

Personalised recommendations