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Membrane Surface Proteinase 3 Expression and Intracytoplasmic Immunoglobulin on Neutrophils from Patients with ANCA-Associated Vasculitides

  • Elena Csernok
  • Wilhelm H. Schmitt
  • Martin Ernst
  • Dorothy F. Bainton
  • Wolfgang L. Gross
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 336)

Summary

We studied the presence of proteinase 3 (PR3), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and elastase (HLE) on the plasma membrane of neutrophils in patients with biopsy-proven Wegener’s disease (WG), pANCA-positive vasculitis, control patients (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis), sepsis patients and healthy donors. We found an overexpression of PR3 on the cell surface of neutrophils in WG, ANCAassociated vasculitis and during infection (sepsis). Thus PR3 becomes accessible to ANCA. Furthermore we detected intracytoplasmic IgG antibodies in PMN from patients with WG by immunoelectron microscopy and direct immunofluorescence. Our findings support the pathophysiological role of ANCA.

Keywords

Human Neutrophil Immunoelectron Microscopy High Disease Activity ANCA Associate Vasculitis Direct Immunofluorescence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elena Csernok
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wilhelm H. Schmitt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martin Ernst
    • 3
  • Dorothy F. Bainton
    • 4
  • Wolfgang L. Gross
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of RheumatologyMedical University of LübeckSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Medical DepartmentRheumaklinik Bad Bramstedt GmbHSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.Forschungsinstitut BorstelGermany
  4. 4.Dept. of PathologyUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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