Ethics of Administration

  • Milton Greenblatt
Part of the Topics in Social Psychiatry book series (TSPS)

Abstract

Ethics in medicine has become prominent in recent years as a result of the numerous social and technological changes in health practice, many of which are beyond the comprehension of the average citizen. In particular, medicine’s increased ability to modify behavior and to prolong life has given rise to philosophical and ethical questions. A decline in political and professional authority after World War II1 (including the authority of physicians), together with growing public concern about the behavior of persons who possess unusual power or expertise, has resulted in great media attention to situations of moral/ethical conflict.2,3,4,5,6,7 Let us begin this odyssey with the patient.

Keywords

Hepatitis Manifold Insurance Coverage Dementia Income 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Milton Greenblatt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Olive View Medical Center — Los Angeles CountySylmarUSA
  2. 2.University of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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