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Lightwave Networks

  • Anthony S. Acampora
Part of the Applications of Communications Theory book series (ACTH)

Abstract

The principles and techniques of broadband networks as presented thus far are based in large measure on a single enabling technology: VLSI. With VLSI, we can cost-effectively implement equipment capable of very sophisticated functionality. We can process the routing and protocol headers of information packets in real time, resolve contention for access rights to LANs and MANs, develop self-routing massively parallel space division packet switches, cast all types of telecommunication traffic into a standard, fixed-length cell format, and provide integrated bandwidth-on-demand to many users geographically dispersed over a very wide geography. Except for its use as the medium for high-speed point-to-point transmission links between pairs of electronic multiplexers, switches, or access modules, the technology of fiber optics is not fundamental to realization of the broadband vision.

Keywords

Asynchronous Transfer Mode Access Station Physical Topology Virtual Circuit Traffic Matrix 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony S. Acampora
    • 1
  1. 1.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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