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The Future of Biological Control

  • Robert van den Bosch
  • P. S. Messenger
  • A. P. Gutierrez

Abstract

Biological control, as measured by the permanent suppression of pest species, ranks as one of the most effective pest (insects, vertebrates, weeds, etc.) control tactics. No one really knows how much benefit has been derived from pest control effected by natural enemies. DeBach (1964) estimated that between 1923 and 1959 classical biological control introductions costing about $4.3 million benefited the California agroeconomy alone in the amount of about $115 million. Unquestionably, many more millions of dollars in direct benefits have accrued in the ensuing years. If we then add the benefits from programs carried out in California before 1923 and those from the many successful programs conducted elsewhere in the world, it is apparent that savings amounting to several hundreds of millions of dollars have been realized from classical biological control. And then, too, we must consider the contribution of biological control to human health and environmental quality in general.

Keywords

Biological Control Natural Enemy Integrate Pest Management Green Peach Aphid Periodic Colonization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert van den Bosch
    • 1
  • P. S. Messenger
    • 1
  • A. P. Gutierrez
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biological ControlUniversity of California, BerkeleyAlbanyUSA

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