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Naturally Occurring Biological Control and Integrated Control

  • Robert van den Bosch
  • P. S. Messenger
  • A. P. Gutierrez

Abstract

Faunistic surveys of agricultural, sylvan, or natural, undisturbed environments will disclose large numbers of herbivorous insect species that are of insignificant abundance, causing little or no harm to the plants growing in such habitats. Many of these insects are kept in check by native natural enemies. We describe this situation as naturally occurring biological control.

Keywords

Biological Control Natural Enemy Spider Mite Treatment Threshold Integrate Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert van den Bosch
    • 1
  • P. S. Messenger
    • 1
  • A. P. Gutierrez
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biological ControlUniversity of California, BerkeleyAlbanyUSA

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