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Identification and Role of Non-Beta Components of Senile Plaque Amyloid in Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Yuji Takamaru
  • Ryo Fukatsu
  • Kayo Tsuzuki
  • Hitoshi Chiba
  • Kunihiko Kobayashi
  • Shigeharu Nagasawa
  • Yuji Aizawa
  • Nobuhiro Fujii
  • Naohiko Takahata
  • Takeji Ueno
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 44)

Abstract

Progressive deposition of amyloid in various morphology is the outstanding neuropathological feature in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease. The β/A4 protein is a principal component of insoluble aggregates of amyloid,1,2 and is the proteolytic cleavage product of the large membrane-spanning glycoprotein, amyloid precursor protein (APP).3,4,5,6 The β/A4 protein itself was reported to be soluble and present in biological fluids.’ On the other hand, proteins other than β/A4 protein, C1q, C3 and C4, α1-antichymotrypsin, interleukin-6, α2macroglobulin, and amyloid P component have also been detected in amyloid depositions.8,9,10,11,12 These amyloid associated proteins may play an important role in the deposition and formation of amyloid.

Keywords

Down Syndrome Brain Homogenate Reactive Antigen Normal Human Plasma Amyloid Protein Precursor mRNA 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yuji Takamaru
    • 1
  • Ryo Fukatsu
    • 4
  • Kayo Tsuzuki
    • 5
  • Hitoshi Chiba
    • 2
  • Kunihiko Kobayashi
    • 2
  • Shigeharu Nagasawa
    • 3
  • Yuji Aizawa
    • 4
  • Nobuhiro Fujii
    • 5
  • Naohiko Takahata
    • 4
  • Takeji Ueno
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and NeurologyJapan
  2. 2.Department of Laboratory MedicineJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of Pharmacology, Hokkaido UniversityJapan
  4. 4.Department of NeuropsychiatryJapan
  5. 5.Department of MicrobiologySapporo Medical University School of MedicineSapporo 060Japan

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