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Uses and Needs for Air Quality Modeling

  • Erich Weber
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 2)

Abstract

A basic assumption in air quality management is that there are cause and effect relationships between pollutant emissions and ambient pollution concentrations. The fundamental physical principles governing such relationships have been under investigation for many years. The investigations have led to mathematical methods for relating measured concentrations of air pollutants at a specific receptor to the rate of emission of pollutants from a variety of sources. Such mathematical methods have been called “air pollution dispersion models” or, more generally, “air quality simulation models”.

Keywords

Dispersion Model Alert System Environmental Impact Statement NATO Country Supplementary Control System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erich Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Federal Ministry of the InteriorBonnFederal Republic of Germany

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