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Application of the CART and NFIS Statistical Analyses to Fogwater and the Deposition of Wet Sulphate in Mountainous Terrain

  • Natty Urquizo
  • John L. Walmsley
  • William R. Burrows
  • Robert S. Schemenauer
  • Jeffrey R. Brook
Part of the NATO • Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 22)

Abstract

Between 1985 and 1991, the Chemistry of High Elevation Fog (CHEF) experiment was conducted on three mountains in southern Quebec, Canada. The CHEF project was linked with the Mountain Cloud Chemistry Project (MCCP) in the Appalachian Mountains of the USA. Measurements were made of liquid water content (LWC) as well as standard meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed, wind direction and precipitation).

Keywords

Terminal Node Liquid Water Content Lift Condensation Level Solar Declination Hourly Meteorological Data 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natty Urquizo
    • 1
  • John L. Walmsley
    • 1
  • William R. Burrows
    • 1
  • Robert S. Schemenauer
    • 1
  • Jeffrey R. Brook
    • 1
  1. 1.Atmospheric Environment ServiceDownsviewCanada

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