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Development and Implementation of the EPA’s Models-3 Initial Operating Version: Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model

  • Daewon W. Byun
  • Jason K. S. Ching
  • Joan Novak
  • Jeff Young
Part of the NATO • Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 22)

Abstract

For the last fifteen years, the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been developing three-dimensional Eulerian based air quality models (AQMs) to study air quality problems, such as urban and regional tropospheric ozone and regional acid deposition. These AQMs simulate comprehensively atmospheric processes such as chemical transformations, transports, and removal of pollutants and their precursors. Model application experience with second generation air quality modeling systems has revealed several shortcomings such as slow execution speed, difficulty in implementing improved science algorithms in the model, and complexity in data exchange among system submodels. Byun et al. (1995) listed some of the shortcomings of the present AQM modeling systems in detail.

Keywords

Application Program Interface Meteorological Model Total Ozone Column Photolysis Rate Study Planner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daewon W. Byun
    • 1
  • Jason K. S. Ching
    • 1
  • Joan Novak
    • 1
  • Jeff Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Atmospheric Sciences Modeling Division, Air Resources LaboratoryNational Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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