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Physical and Mathematical Modelling of Heavy Gas Dispersion — Accuracy and Reliability

  • N. J. Duijm
  • A. P. van Ulden
  • W. H. H. van Heugten
  • P. J. H. Builtjes
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 10)

Abstract

The dispersion of hazardous and toxic gas, often cold and/or heavy in nature, is an important issue within the framework of risk analysis studies associated therewith.

In addition to the analysis of the behaviour of these gases on dispersion by experiments carried out in the field, such an analysis can also be carried out with mathematical models, wind and water tunnels.

The different possibilities and impossibilities offered by the use of wind and water tunnels, mathematical box-models and the so-called three-dimensional models are presented herein.

By analyzing the results obtained from a small scale dispersion experiment carried out in a calm environment, and the results obtained from a wind-tunnel simulation of one of the Thorney Island experiments, two scaling rules have been determined which can play an important role in reliability of physical modelling alongside the scaling-rules in normal current use.

Keywords

Wind Tunnel Atmospheric Boundary Layer Atmospheric Dispersion Water Tunnel IUTAM Symposium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. J. Duijm
    • 1
  • A. P. van Ulden
    • 2
  • W. H. H. van Heugten
    • 3
  • P. J. H. Builtjes
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Fluid DynamicsMT-TNOApeldoornThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Royal Dutch Meteorologisch InstituteKNMIDe BiltThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Industrial SafetyMT-TNOApeldoornThe Netherlands

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