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Regional Oxidant Modeling of the Northeast U.S.

  • Kenneth L. Schere
  • Joan H. Novak
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 10)

Abstract

The development and application of a photochemical model capable of simulating regional transport of ozone and its precursors are the focus of an extensive program now in progress at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This model, the Regional Oxidant Model (ROM) is designed for use in evaluating the effectiveness of various emission control strategies on a regional (1000 km) scale. The first model application will be for the Northeast U.S. where various studies have demonstrated the occurrence of widespread episodes of high ozone concentrations.1,2 The purposes of this paper are to describe the basis and structure of the ROM including design and implementation considerations and to present some preliminary model results.

Keywords

sUbgrid Scale Cumulus Cloud National Weather Service Thermal Internal Boundary Layer Processor Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth L. Schere
    • 1
  • Joan H. Novak
    • 1
  1. 1.Atmospheric Sciences Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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