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Inhibitory Effect of Mercaptoamino Acids on Lysinoalanine Formation During Alkali Treatment of Proteins

  • John W. Finley
  • John T. Snow
  • Philip H. Johnston
  • Mendel Friedman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 86)

Abstract

Alkali treatment of food proteins converts some amino acid residues to the unnatural amino acid lysinoalanine which has been found to cause kidney damage when fed to rats. Formation of lysinoalanine was essentially prevented when isolates of soy protein and casein were exposed to alkali in the presence of thioalamino acids such as cysteine. The results suggest that added thiols minimize the formation of potentially toxic lysinoalanine.

Keywords

Glutathione Cysteine Lysine Thiol Aflatoxin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Finley
    • 1
  • John T. Snow
    • 1
  • Philip H. Johnston
    • 1
  • Mendel Friedman
    • 1
  1. 1.Western Regional Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research ServiceU.S. Department of AgricultureBerkeleyUSA

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