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Assessment of Couples

  • Alan E. Fruzzetti
  • Neil S. Jacobson
Part of the Advances in Psychological Assessment book series (AIPA, volume 8)

Abstract

The field of couple assessment, like so many other areas of clinical assessment, is in the midst of substantial theoretical and practical self-analysis and revision. Different theoretical orientations in this field have co-existed mostly in isolation from one another, and advocates of each orientation have maintained their own more-or-less standard approach to assessment. These standard approaches generally have involved following a rather detailed recipe of procedures. Thus, each theoretical approach to couple assessment has been quite specific in terms of goals and methods, albeit of a different flavor.

Keywords

Interaction Pattern Relationship Satisfaction Marital Satisfaction Behavioral Assessment Couple Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan E. Fruzzetti
    • 1
  • Neil S. Jacobson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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