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Genetic Variation in Tropical Meloidogyne Species

  • Mireille Fargette
  • Vivian C. Blok
  • Mark S. Phillips
  • David L. Trudgill
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 268)

Abstract

In tropical regions the parthenogenetic Meloidogyne spp. are major crop pests. The presence of populations in West Africa which overcome resistance in cultivars as diverse as tomato cv. ‘Rossol’, sweet potato cv. ‘CDH’ and soya bean cv. ‘Forrest’ has been reported (Prot, 1984; Fargette and Braaksma, 1990). The relationship of these populations to other tropical Meloidogyne spp. was investigated as the nature of such resistance breaking populations has implications both for integrated control and for appropriate quarantine measures. At a broader level, variation within the various tropical Meloidogyne spp. is also of interest to gain an understanding of the extent of genetic variation in this important group of pests.

Keywords

Intraspecific Variation RAPD Analysis RAPD Data Quarantine Measure Scottish Crop Research Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mireille Fargette
    • 1
  • Vivian C. Blok
    • 2
  • Mark S. Phillips
    • 2
  • David L. Trudgill
    • 2
  1. 1.ORSTOM-MontpellierMontpellier Cedex 1France
  2. 2.Scottish Crop Research InstituteInvergowrie, DundeeScotland

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