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Chemoreception in Nematodes

  • Paolo Bazzicalupo
  • Laura De Riso
  • Francesco Maimone
  • Filomena Ristoratore
  • Marisa Sebastiano
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 268)

Abstract

Chemical signals from the environment are the most important sensory inputs for nematodes. The ability to receive and interpret chemical signals from the environment is essential for nematodes, parasitic or free living, to complete their life cycle. Chemoreceptors are needed: (i) to find food and good environmental conditions, for instance to find the host in parasitic species; (ii) to reach the host’s organs in which development can take place and to interpret signals from the host that trigger important developmental switches; (iii) to avoid predators and dangerous or toxic chemicals; (iv) to interpret signals from other individuals of the species that signal crowding; (v) to find the opposite sex for reproduction. If better understood at the cellular and molecular level, chemoreception would have enormous potential as a target for the control of nematodes.

Keywords

Avoidance Response Light Touch Garlic Extract Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans Good Environmental Condition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paolo Bazzicalupo
    • 1
  • Laura De Riso
    • 1
  • Francesco Maimone
    • 2
    • 3
  • Filomena Ristoratore
    • 1
  • Marisa Sebastiano
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto Internazionale di Genetica e BiofisicaConsiglio Nazionale delle RicercheNapoliItaly
  2. 2.Isituto di GeneticaUniversità di BariItaly
  3. 3.CIRPSUniversità di RomaItaly

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