Selective Depression of Peripheral Chemoreflex Loop by Sevoflurane in Lightly Anesthetized Cats

  • Luc Teppema
  • Elise Sarton
  • Albert Dahan
  • Kees Olievier
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 450)

Abstract

In animal studies it has been shown that volatile anesthetics depress the ventilatory response to hypoxia and hypercapnia compared to the awake state.1,2 The findings that 0.5–1% halothane reduces activity in afferent nerve fibres of the carotid bodies,3 and that halothane, enflurane and isoflurane inhibit CO2-O2 interaction1,2, indicate that these inha-lational anesthetics may directly act on the peripheral chemoreceptors. This, however, was not confirmed by Berkenbosch and coworkers,4,5 who found that in cats lightly anesthetized with chloralose-urethane, overall anesthesia with halothane, or selective administration of this agent to the peripheral chemoreceptors reduced the gains of the peripheral and central chemoreflex loops to the same extent.

Keywords

Depression Isoflurane Halothane Sevoflurane Urethane 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luc Teppema
    • 1
  • Elise Sarton
    • 2
  • Albert Dahan
    • 2
  • Kees Olievier
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenThe Netherlands

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