Advertisement

Thermal Conductivity of Sintered Nickel Films Obtained with the HVOF Technique

  • F. Pavese
  • D. Ferri
  • D. Giraudi
  • M. Vanolo
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

Thermal conductivity has been measured in the range 6–130 K on sheets of nickel 0.1 mm thick produced by sintering powder sprayed in layers with the HVOF detonation technique. This technique, which pertains to the thermal-spray family, uses a high-velocity jet of low-temperature (≈1000 °C) gas, obtained by detonation of propane in air, for carrying the powder. Sintering in a controlled-atmosphere furnace of the layer obtained in this way follows. The aim is to obtain a metal substrate with a thermal conductivity lower than that of the bulk material, for use in a certain number of applications that require metal substrates of the lowest thermal conductivity. The paper reports on the technique and on the results obtained on nickel using a modular thermal conductivity apparatus that is used simply by immersion in a liquid helium (or liquid nitrogen) standard storage dewar with a 50 mm neck and is fully run by a computer, allowing for routine measurements in the range 5–350 K with an uncertainty as low as ± 4% on silica. In the present work, uncertainty of the measurements on sintered nickel was ≈ ± 30%.

Keywords

Thermal Conductivity Continuous Detonation Thermal Conductivity Bulk Thermal Conductivity Result Sintered Nickel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    G. P. Peterson, and L. S. Fletcher, J. Thermophvsics and Heat Transfer 1: 343 (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. Januszewski, M. LKhokhar, and A. S. Mujumdar, Letters in Heat and Mass Transfer 4: 417 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    N. Deprez, D. S. McLachlan, and I. Sigalas, Physica A 157: 181 (1989)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    F. Pavese, M. Bianco, A. Tampieri, M. Itoh, M. Vanolo, D. Giraudi, G. Celotti, and K. Mori, Adv. Cryo. Engin. 42: (1998). See these proceedingsGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    F. Pavese, M. Bianco, D. Andreone, R. Cresta, and P. Rellecati, Physica C 204: 1 (1992)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    F. Pavese, V. M. Malyshev P. P. M. Steur, D. Ferri, and D. Giraudi, Adv. Cryo. Engin. 41: 1683 (1995)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Y. S. Touloukian, R. W. Powell, C. Y. Ho, and P. G. Klemens (Eds. ), Thermal Conductivity of Metallic Elements and Alloys, in: Thermophysical Properties of Matter, Vol. I, IFI/Plenum, New York (1970)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Pavese
    • 1
  • D. Ferri
    • 1
  • D. Giraudi
    • 1
  • M. Vanolo
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Metrologia “G.Colonnetti” (1MGC)CNRTorinoItaly

Personalised recommendations