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Welding Consumable Development for a Cryogenic (4 K) Application

  • S. F. Kane
  • T. A. Siewert
  • C. N. McCowan
  • A. L. Farland
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 44)

Abstract

This paper summarizes the development and qualification of an appropriate welding consumable for a demanding cryogenic magnet application. This research shows that higher oxygen content in the weld manifests itself as inclusions, which have a severe detrimental effect upon the fracture toughness at 4 K. Also, welds enriched with manganese and nickel have demonstrated improved fracture toughness. These discoveries were combined in the development of a nitrogen- and manganese-modified, high-nickel stainless-steel alloy. It produced gas metal arc welds with superior cryogenic mechanical properties when welding procedures were modified to reduce the oxygen content.

Keywords

Fracture Toughness Austenitic Stainless Steel Stainless Steel Weld Weld Journal Inclusion Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. F. Kane
    • 1
  • T. A. Siewert
    • 2
  • C. N. McCowan
    • 2
  • A. L. Farland
    • 1
  1. 1.Brookhaven National LaboratoryUptonUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA

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