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Effects of High Magnetic Fields on Martensitic Transformation at Cryogenic Temperatures for Variously Heat Treated Stainless Steels

  • Koji Shibata
  • Yasushi Kurita
  • Tsutomu Shimonosono
  • Yoshiaki Murakami
  • Satoshi Awaji
  • Kazuo Watanabe
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

The effects of magnetic fields up to 20 T on the isothermal martensitic transformation were examined in 304L and 316LN stainless steels which were heated at various solution treatment temperatures and cooled from these temperatures at variou rates. In the 316LN steel, since the amount of the martensite induced by the application of the magnetic fields was very small, the effects were not clear. In the 304L steel, a larger amount of α’ martensite was induced by the application of magnetic fields at liquid nitrogen temperature than at liquid helium temperature. The amount of α' martensite which was induced in magnetic fields increased with solution treatment temperatures and cooling rate from the temperatures. The amount of α' martensite did not increase linearly with an increase in the applied magnetic field but seemed to be saturated before the amount of the martensite attained 10 volume %.

Keywords

Magnetic Field Martensitic Transformation Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Isothermal Transformation Liquid Helium Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koji Shibata
    • 1
  • Yasushi Kurita
    • 2
  • Tsutomu Shimonosono
    • 3
  • Yoshiaki Murakami
    • 3
  • Satoshi Awaji
    • 4
  • Kazuo Watanabe
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Materials ScienceUniversity of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan
  2. 2.Nippon Steel CorporationJapan
  3. 3.University of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113Japan
  4. 4.High Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials Institute for Materials ResearchTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, Sendai 980Japan

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