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Tensile Properties of Resins at Low Temperatures

  • R. P. Reed
  • R. P. Walsh
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

The tensile properties of eight epoxy, four cyanate-ester, four vinyl-ester, and one polyester resin systems have been measured at 295, 76, and 4 K. Several filled resin systems and multifunctional epoxy systems were included. The resin systems were selected on the basis of their potential for use in filament winding or pultrusion production of fiberglass-reinforced struts. Most of the resin systems are currently available from commercial vendors.

At room temperature, all classes of resin systems in this study had similar strengths, but filled systems and multifunctional epoxy systems had higher Young’s moduli. At low temperatures, some vinyl esters had higher tensile strengths, and the cyanate esters had lower tensile strengths. The filled systems and multifunctional epoxies also had relatively low tensile strengths. Tensile failures occurred at single, embedded or surface flaws at all temperatures. The tensile strength was correlated with the flaw size, and two distinct trend lines were constructed for 295-K data and for combined 76- and 4-K data.

Keywords

Tensile Strength Ultimate Tensile Strength Flaw Size Vinyl Ester Resin System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Reed
    • 1
  • R. P. Walsh
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Cryogenic Materials, Inc.BoulderUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA
  3. 3.Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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