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Effects of Surface Treatment with Plasma on Adhesive Strengths at Cryogenic Temperature

  • Shigehiro Nishijima
  • Shu Ueno
  • Masanobu Nunogaki
  • Toichi Okada
  • Shingo Namba
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

The variations of adhesive strength at cryogenic temperature of epoxy to polyimide (PI) or polyethylene (PE) films, which were exposed in plasma composed of one of nitrogen, argon and oxygen, were studied for the simulation of the interface strength between polymeric fibers and resins of advanced composite materials. Plasma surface treatments for polymeric films were performed aiming at increasing surface energy without spoiling bulk properties of films. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) was employed for production of plasmas and its characteristics was evaluated. The results indicated that surface energies of films increased when the films were deposited to plasma. A film-resinfilm lap test were also carried out. In the case of untreated PE films, debonding at film-resin interface arised on cooling down process to cryogenic temperatures. On the other hand, in the case of plasma treated films, debonding was not induced in cooling down process. Adhesive strength between film and resin was improved by ECR plasma processing for a few ten seconds' exposure. Surface analysis revealed that the introduction of polar groups induced the improvement. The plasma treatment was found to be applicable to the organic fibers.

Keywords

Plasma Treatment Adhesive Strength Liquid Nitrogen Temperature Cryogenic Temperature Electron Cyclotron Resonance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigehiro Nishijima
    • 1
  • Shu Ueno
    • 1
  • Masanobu Nunogaki
    • 1
  • Toichi Okada
    • 1
  • Shingo Namba
    • 2
  1. 1.ISIROsaka UniversityIbaraki, Osaka 567Japan
  2. 2.University of Osaka PrefectureSakai, Osaka 591Japan

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