Advertisement

(Nb,Ti)3Sn Multifilamentary Wires with Cu-Nb Reinforcing Stabilizer

  • K. Goto
  • M. Sugimoto
  • T. Saito
  • O. Kohno
  • S. Awaji
  • K. Watanabe
Part of the An International Cryogenic Materials Conference Publication book series (ACRE, volume 40)

Abstract

The mechanical and electrical properties of Cu-Nb composites were investigated from the standpoint of reinforcement and stabilizing materials for a Nb3Sn wire. After annealing at 943K for 240 hours, Cu-15, 20 and 30wt%Nb composites had the 0.2% proof stress of 228, 246 and 26OMPa at room temperature, respectively. A bronze processed multifilamentary (Nb,Ti)3Sn wire with Cu-Nb reinforcing stabilizer was newly developed. The 0.2% proof stress at 4.2K of the Cu-Nb/(Nb,Ti)3Sn wire was noticeably improved and the value of 314MPa was obtained after the heat-treatment of (Nb,Ti)3Sn formation at 943K for 200 hours. The strain effect of the critical current for Cu-Nb/(Nb,Ti)3Sn were measured at 14T and 4.2K. The strain dependence of Ic/Icm of the Cu-Nb/(Nb,Ti)3Sn wire was nearly the same profile as the conventional wire. It was verified that the Cu-Nb/(Nb,Ti)3Sn wire has the performance enough for both mechanical and superconducting properties under an enormous electromagnetic force in high magnetic fields such as 15T or more.

Keywords

Critical Current Proof Stress Intrinsic Strain Residual Resistance Ratio Areal Reduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1).
    R. Flukiger, E. Drost, W. Goldacker and W. Specking, Superconducting and mechanical properties of internally steel reinforced Nb3Sn wires with Ta or (Ni+Zn) additions IEEE Trans. Magn. MAG-19, 1441(1983)Google Scholar
  2. 2).
    E. Gregory, L. R. Motowidlo, G. M. Ozeryansky and L. T. Summers, “High strength Nb3Sn conductors for high magnetic field applications” IEEE Trans. Magn. 27, 2033 (1991)Google Scholar
  3. 3).
    S. Nakayama, S, Murase, K. Shimamura, N. Aoki and N. Shiga, “Alumina dispersion-strengthened copper alloy matrix Ti added Nb3Sn wire by the tube process” Adv. Cryo. Eng. Mat. 38A, 279 (1992)Google Scholar
  4. 4).
    K. Watanabe, S. Awaji, K. Noto, K. Goto, M. Sugimoto, T. Saito and 0. Kohno, “Cu-Nb reinforcing stabilizer for Nb3Sn” Proc. of 7th US-Japan work shop on high field superconducting materials, wires and conductors, and standardizing procedures for high-field superconducting wires testing, edited by K. Yamafuji and M. Suenaga, Fukuoka, p148(1991)Google Scholar
  5. 5).
    K. Watanabe, A. Hoshi, S. Awaji, K. Katagiri, K. Noto, K. Goto, M. Sugimoto, T. Saito and 0. Kohno. Kohno, “Nb3Sn multifilamentary wires with Cu-Nb reinforcing stabilizer” IEEE Trans. on Appl. Super., vol. 3, 1006 (1993)Google Scholar
  6. 6).
    Y. Ikeno, M. Sugimoto, K. Goto and 0. Kohno. Kohno, “Development of Nb3Sn superconducting wire using an in-situ processed large ingot ” Adv. Cryo. Eng. Mat. 36A, 125 (1991)Google Scholar
  7. 7).
    K. Katagiri, M. Fukumoto, K. Saito, M. Ohgami, T. Okada, A. Nagata, K. Noto and K. Watanabe, “An apparatus for evaluating strain effect of critical current in superconducting wires in magnetic fields up to 16.5T, Adv. Cryo. Eng. Mat. 36, 69 (1982)Google Scholar
  8. 8).
    J. F. Bussiere, B. Fancher, C. L. Snead. Jr. and M. Suenaga, “Effects of Ternary Additions on Young’s Modulus and the martensitic transformation of Nb3Sn” Adv. C.yo. Eng. Mat. 28, 453 (1982)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Goto
    • 1
  • M. Sugimoto
    • 1
  • T. Saito
    • 1
  • O. Kohno
    • 1
  • S. Awaji
    • 2
  • K. Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Materials Research LaboratoryFujikura Ltd.Koto-ku, Tokyo 135Japan
  2. 2.Institute for Materials ResearchTohoku UniversityAoba-ku, Sendai 980Japan

Personalised recommendations