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Materials pp 323-330 | Cite as

Tribological Behavior of 440C Martensitic Stainless Steel from −184°C to 750°C

  • A. J. Slifka
  • R. Compos
  • T. J. Morgan
  • J. D. Siegwarth
  • Dilip K. Chaudhuri
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 38)

Abstract

Characterization of the coefficient of friction and wear rate of 440C stainless steel is needed to understand the effects of frictional heating in the bearings of the High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The coefficient of friction and wear rate have been measured over a range of temperature varying from liquid oxygen temperature (−184°C) to 750°C. The normal load has also been varied resulting in a variation of Hertzian stress from 0.915 to 3.660 GPa while the surface velocity has been varied from 0.5 to 2.0 m/s.

Keywords

Wear Rate Wear Surface Wear Track Shear Resistance Wear Scar 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Slifka
    • 1
  • R. Compos
    • 1
  • T. J. Morgan
    • 1
  • J. D. Siegwarth
    • 1
  • Dilip K. Chaudhuri
    • 2
  1. 1.Chemical Engineering DivisionNational Institute of Standards and TechnologyBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentTennessee State UniversityNashvilleUSA

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