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Construction, Commissioning, and Cryogenic Performances of the First TESLA Test Facility (TTF) Cryomodule

  • C. Pagani
  • J. G. WeisendII
  • R. Bandelmann
  • D. Barni
  • A. Bosotti
  • G. Grygiel
  • H. Kaiser
  • U. Knopf
  • R. Lange
  • F. Loeffler
  • P. Pierini
  • O. Peters
  • B. Petersen
  • D. Sellmann
  • S. Wolff
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

A principal goal of the ongoing TESLA superconducting linac project is the production of affordable cryostats that still meet stringent requirements for alignment, vibration and heat leak. Each cryostat contains 8 superconducting RF cavities cooled to 1.8 K, a quadrupole magnet package cooled to 4.5 K, thermal shields cooled to 70 K and 4.5 K, active and passive magnetic shielding, cryogenic service pipes and all associated instrumentation. The axes of the 8 cavities must be aligned to the ideal beam axis to within ± 0.5 mm and those of the quadrupoles to within ± 0.1 mm. Additionally, the vertical mid plane of the quadrupole package must be aligned to the vertical direction to ± 0.1 mrad. These alignments must remain fixed after cool down and during operation. The cryostat must be designed so that there are no resonant vibration modes near the 10 Hz operating frequency of the accelerator. Although dynamic loads associated with the operation of the RF and the beam dominate the heat load, reasonable efforts to reduce the static heat leak into the cryostat are necessary.

The first of these cryostats has been tested in early June, 1997. This paper reports on the assembly of the cryostat and its performance during cryogenic and beam testing. Alignment, heat leak and vibration data are among the results discussed. The impact of the cryostat on the performance of the superconducting cavities is reviewed. Planned improvements in the cryostat design are also covered.

Keywords

Vacuum Vessel Support Post Heat Leak Magnetic Shield Thermal Shield 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    TESLA Test Facility linac — Design Report, DESY Report, March 1995, TESLA 95–01.Google Scholar
  2. Conceptual design of a 500 GeV e+e- linear collider with integrated X ray laser facility, R. Brinkmann et al., editors, DESY Report, 1997–048, 1997.Google Scholar
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    F. Alessandria, G. Cavallari, M. Minestrini, T. H. Nichol, C. Pagani, R. Palmieri, S. Tazzari, G. Varisco, Design manufacture and test of the TESLA-TTF cavity cryostat, Adv.Cryo. Engr. 41A:855 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    D. Giove, A. Bosotti, C. Pagani, G. Varisco, A Wire Position Monitor (WPM) system to control the cold mass movements inside the TTF cryomodule, PAC97, Vancouver.Google Scholar
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    D. Barni, C. Pagani, P. Pierini, M. Todero, Cooldown simulations for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) cryostat, Paper # FF 4, 1997 CEC/ICMC, Portland.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Pagani
    • 1
  • J. G. WeisendII
    • 2
  • R. Bandelmann
    • 2
  • D. Barni
    • 1
  • A. Bosotti
    • 1
  • G. Grygiel
    • 2
  • H. Kaiser
    • 2
  • U. Knopf
    • 2
  • R. Lange
    • 2
  • F. Loeffler
    • 2
  • P. Pierini
    • 1
  • O. Peters
    • 2
  • B. Petersen
    • 2
  • D. Sellmann
    • 2
  • S. Wolff
    • 2
  1. 1.INFN Milano-LASASegrate (MI)Italy
  2. 2.DESYHamburgGermany

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