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Conduction Cooled High-Temperature Superconducting Magnetic Bearing Module

  • H. J. Bornemann
  • W. Fieger
  • A. Weindl
  • A. W. Kaiser
  • R. Koch
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

We have designed, built and tested a prototype of a conduction cooled HTSC bearing module. A superconducting ring, measuring ∅ 102 mm × 13 mm high was assembled from HTSC bulk material. Total mass is 547 g. Lifting force and stability at 77 K and 2 mm gap are approximately 150 N and 80 N/mm, respectively. The superconductor is integrated on a metallic cold plate. Modelling has been used for evaluation of thermal losses and optimization of the cryogenic design. For the present module, total losses at 0.01 Pa insulation vacuum are as small as 1 W, mainly due to radiation. Based on the thermal model the scaling behavior with respect to thermal losses as a function of maximum lifting capability was evaluated. The cooling power was found to be equivalent to about 400 mW electrical power per kg of levitated mass which compares quite favorably to the typical 0.1 …1 W per kg for conventional active magnetic bearings. Details of both experimental work and modelling will be reported.

Keywords

Levitation Force Magnetic Bearing Cooling Power Total Heat Transfer Cold Plate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Bornemann
    • 1
  • W. Fieger
    • 1
  • A. Weindl
    • 1
  • A. W. Kaiser
    • 1
  • R. Koch
    • 1
  1. 1.Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbHINFPKarlsruheGermany

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