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Theoretical Performance of Single Stage and Two Stage Superfluid Stirling Refrigerators Using Kapton Recuperators

  • Ashok B. Patel
  • J. G. Brisson
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 43)

Abstract

Previous superfluid Stirling refrigerators (SSR) using CuNi recuperators have experimentally achieved temperatures of 0.168 K and 0.296 K operating from high temperatures of 0.383 K and 1.05 K respectively. This article describes the theoretical performance of a single stage SSR and a two stage SSR which use Kapton recuperators. Specifically, a single stage SSR operating from a high temperature of 1.0 K should achieve a low temperature of 0.22 K and deliver 420 µW of cooling power at 0.3 K. A two stage SSR operating from a high temperature of 1.0 K should reach a low temperature of 0.12 K and deliver 750 µW of cooling power at 0.30 K.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Coefficient Heat Exchanger Cooling Power Cryogenic Engineer Stirling Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ashok B. Patel
    • 1
  • J. G. Brisson
    • 1
  1. 1.Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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