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The Psychological Sequelae of Child Sexual Abuse

  • Vicky V. Wolfe
  • Jo-Ann Birt
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 17)

Abstract

Traditionally, child psychopathology research has been focused on discrete symptomatology leading to diagnosable disorders or behavioral/emotional syndromes. For example, psychiatric nosologies for children and adolescents have typically focused on symptom constellations such as depression, anxiety, and conduct disorders. As research has progressed in these areas, etiological studies have contributed to a growing realization that many major childhood problems have their origins in dysfunctional environmental circumstances. For instance, research with conduct-problem children has identified numerous family processes that have functional relationships with externalizing forms of behavior problems (e.g., inconsistent consequences for positive and negative behaviors).

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Abuse Child Child Sexual Abuse Ptsd Symptom Attributional Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vicky V. Wolfe
    • 1
  • Jo-Ann Birt
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyChildren’s Hospital of Western OntarioLondon, OntarioUK

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