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Social Withdrawal in Childhood

Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives
  • Kenneth H. Rubin
  • Shannon L. Stewart
  • Robert J. Coplan
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 17)

Keywords

Social Skill Parenting Style Social Competence Middle Childhood Social Withdrawal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth H. Rubin
    • 1
  • Shannon L. Stewart
    • 1
  • Robert J. Coplan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WaterlooCanada

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