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Bowlby’s Dream Comes Full Circle

The Application of Attachment Theory to Risk and Psychopathology
  • Dante Cicchetti
  • Sheree L. Toth
  • Michael Lynch
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 17)

Abstract

In formulating his theoretical perspective on the development of human attachment relationships, Bowlby incorporated knowledge from a variety of disciplines, viewpoints, and research paradigms (Ainsworth & Bowlby, 1991; Bretherton, 1992). Psychoanalysis, object relations theory, Sullivanian interpersonal psychiatry, social, experimental and developmental psychology, evolutionary theory, and ethology all exerted major impacts on Bowlby’s hypotheses regarding the origins, course, and sequelae of secure and insecure attachment relationships (Ainsworth, 1967, 1969; Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978; Bowlby, 1969/1982, 1973, 1980; Bretherton, 1987, 1991).

Keywords

Attachment Theory Full Circle Insecure Attachment Attachment Relationship Attachment Figure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dante Cicchetti
    • 1
  • Sheree L. Toth
    • 1
  • Michael Lynch
  1. 1.Mt. Hope Family CenterUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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