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Preventive Intervention Research

Pathways for Extending Knowledge of Child/Adolescent Health and Pathology
  • Raymond P. Lorion
  • Tracy G. Myers
  • Carol Bartels
  • Alisa Dennis
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 16)

Abstract

This chapter examines the public health rationale and scientific prerequisites and benefits of designing, implementing, and evaluating preventive interventions targeted to children and adolescents. It is argued herein that the continued scientific emergence of such interventions can make significant pragmatic and theoretical contributions to the physical and emotional health of the nation’s children and adolescents.

Keywords

Mental Health Primary Prevention Preventive Intervention Government Printing American Psychological Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond P. Lorion
    • 1
  • Tracy G. Myers
    • 1
  • Carol Bartels
    • 1
  • Alisa Dennis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Maryland at College ParkCollege ParkUSA

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