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New Developments in Assessing Pediatric Anxiety Disorders

  • John S. March
  • Anne Marie Albano
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 20)

Abstract

Presumably because it is associated with significant suffering, disruption in normal psychosocial and academic development and also family functioning, pathological anxiety is among the more common causes of referral to children’s mental health-care providers (Black, 1995a; Simon, Ormel, VonKorff, & Barlow, 1995). From a diagnostic point of view, however, fears and anxieties are ubiquitous, so that clinicians and researchers interested in childhood anxiety disorders face the daunting task of differentiating pathological anxiety from fears occurring as a part of normal developmental processes (Costello & Angold, 1995c). Ideally, diagnostic tools designed specifically to assess anxiety in young persons should (1) provide reliable and valid ascertainment of symptoms across multiple symptom domains; (2) discriminate symptom clusters; (3) evaluate severity; (4) incorporate and reconcile multiple observations, such as parent and child ratings; and (5) be sensitive to treatment-induced change in symptoms. Other factors influencing instrument selection include the reasons for the assessment (e.g., screening, diagnosis, or monitoring treatment outcome), as well as time required for administration, level of training necessary to administer and/or interpret the instrument, reading level, and cost.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Social Phobia Panic Disorder Adolescent Psychiatry Attention Deficit Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • John S. March
    • 1
  • Anne Marie Albano
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology: Social and Health SciencesDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Anxiety Research and Treatment Center, Department of PsychologyUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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