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Continuities and Discontinuities in Antisocial Behavior from Childhood to Adult Life

  • Barbara Maughan
  • Michael Rutter
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 20)

Abstract

Much adult psychopathology has its roots in childhood difficulties; nowhere is that tendency more apparent than in the antisocial domain. From the time of the first long-term follow-ups (Robins, 1966, 1978) it has been clear that most severely antisocial adults have long histories of disruptive and deviant behavior reaching back to childhood. Yet these same studies also highlighted an apparent paradox: looking forward from childhood, the picture was a rather different one. Most conduct-disordered children did not grow up to be severely antisocial adults, and for many, discontinuity, rather than continuity, seemed the more usual course.

Keywords

Conduct Problem Antisocial Behavior Adolescent Psychiatry Child Psychology Conduct Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Maughan
    • 1
  • Michael Rutter
    • 1
  1. 1.Genetic, and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre, Institute of PsychiatryMRC Child Psychiatry Unit and SocialLondonEngland

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