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Children of Lesbian and Gay Parents

  • Charlotte J. Patterson
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 19)

Abstract

What kinds of home environments are best able to support children’s psychological adjustment and growth? This question has long held a central place in the field of research on child development. Researchers in the United States have often assumed that the most favorable home environments are provided by white, middle-class, two-parent families, in which the father is paid to work outside the home but the mother is not. Although rarely stated explicitly, it has most often been assumed that both parents in such families are heterosexual.

Keywords

Sexual Orientation Child Care Sexual Identity Biological Mother Biological Father 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlotte J. Patterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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