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Obsessive—Compulsive Disorder in Childhood and Adolescence

  • Aude Henin
  • Philip C. Kendall
Part of the Advances in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ACCP, volume 19)

Abstract

Although Janet (1903) identified obsessive-compulsive neurosis in children as young as 5 years of age, the disorder has since remained largely unexamined: a mere handful of single case studies or small clinical samples of children diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and little research regarding the clinical presentation or treatment exists. It is only in the past 10 years that OCD has been recognized as a serious psychopathology of childhood and that significant attention has been mounted toward its study. This recent interest has been inspired, in great part, by the finding that a large percentage of adult sufferers of OCD (33–50%) report onset of the disorder prior to age 15 (Beech, 1974), and has been fueled by subsequent studies demonstrating that the prevalence rate of the disorder is significantly higher in children than previously believed.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Adolescent Psychiatry Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Overanxious Disorder Child Assessment Schedule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aude Henin
    • 1
  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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