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Etiology and Pathogenesis of Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders

  • Yifrah Kaminer
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

There is a growing consensus in the literature that children of alcoholics (COAs) or of parents with other psychoactive substance use disorders (PSUDs) are more prone to PSUDs and PSUD-related problems than are children of nonabusers (Cotton, 1979; Hill, Steinhauer, Smith, & Locke, 1991). Also, PSUDs and other psychiatric disorders such as antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and mood disorders tend to cluster in families (Merikangas, Leckman, Prusoff, Pauls, & Weissman, 1985). COAs are at least 4–5 times more likely to become alcoholics than are children of nonalcoholic parents (Goodwin, 1985). Variables that are most reliably associated with heightened risk of alcoholism are family history of alcoholism and history of antisocial behavior in adolescence (Nathan, 1988). Indeed, based on more than 100 studies reviewed by Cotton (1979), the strong familial aggregation of alcoholism is one of the most robust findings in medical research.

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Psychoactive Substance Harm Avoidance Adolescent Substance Temperament Trait 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yifrah Kaminer
    • 1
  1. 1.Alcohol Research CenterThe University of Connecticut Health CenterFarmingtonUSA

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