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Durability Evaluation of Adhesive Bonded Structures

  • J. Dean Minford

Abstract

The fact that no universal theory of adhesion exists confirms that adhesion science is an exceedingly complex and controversial subject. Although we have made great strides in recent years with the development of considerable accuracy in measuring the properties of practical adhesive materials, it remains impossible to predict with the same accuracy the service life of those materials in a bonded final assembly. This should be anticipated if we recognize that the bonded assembly is a much more complex system than the adhesive or adherend component parts. In particular, we must take note of the nonhomogeneity of the typical adherend surface where uniformly good wetting by the adhesive must take place before the curing of the adhesive to its ultimate strength. In addition, the simultaneous action of the environmental and stressing factors in the service condition is so complex that life prediction remains largely empirical.

Keywords

Adhesive Bond Joint Strength Adhesive Joint Conversion Coating Epoxy Adhesive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Dean Minford
    • 1
  1. 1.Hilton Head IslandUSA

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