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Pretense

Acting “As If”
  • Inge Bretherton
  • Marjorie Beeghly
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

In pretense, children perform actions not to achieve everyday objectives but to create alternative social and physical realities. This ability to operate in the subjunctive mode is acquired surprisingly early in development. True, 1-year-olds are limited to pretending that they are asleep or are drinking juice when, in reality, they are not. But soon children can playfully assume family or occupational roles that they do not have to perform in everyday life until adulthood, and later still they can create impossible worlds through enactments in which physical and social causality as well as natural laws are suspended or turned upside down.

Keywords

Event Representation Representational System Daycare Center Impossible World Symbolic Play 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Inge Bretherton
    • 1
  • Marjorie Beeghly
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Child and Family StudiesUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Child Development UnitChildren’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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