Advertisement

Contextual Influences on Imitative Interactions between Mothers and Infants

  • Ina Č. Užgiris
  • Janette B. Benson
  • Jan C. Kruper
  • Marie E. Vasek
Part of the Perspectives in Developmental Psychology book series (PDPS)

Abstract

It is a challenge for developmental psychology to understand how an individual’s experience is interlaced in the construction of competence, for experience is at once constrained by existing competence and a means for enhancing competence. As competence is utilized in different contexts, some features of experience are retained and influence future deployment of competence. Moreover, it is through experience that the lines of cultural and personal distinctiveness are introduced into the universal patterns of human development. Our purpose here is not to discuss the different ways that the role of experience may be understood nor the biological and social contexts within which experience takes shape, but to examine the structure of one kind of experience common during the first year of life—imitative interaction.

Keywords

Contextual Influence Symbolic Play Match Activity Seating Arrangement Interpersonal Exchange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bakeman, R., & Adamson, L. B. ( 1985, April). Infants’ conventionalized acts: Gestures and words with mothers and peers. Paper presented at the meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Toronto, Canada.Google Scholar
  2. Bates, E., Benigni, L., Bretherton, I., Camaioni, L., & Volterra, V. (1979). The emergence of symbols: Cognition and communication in infancy. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bretherton, I., O’Connell, B., Shore, C., & Bates, E. (1984). The effect of contextual variation on symbolic play development from 20 to 28 months. In I. Bretherton (Ed.), Symbolic play, (pp. 271–298 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  4. Bruner, J. S. (1978). Learning how to do things with words. In J. S. Bruner & A. Garton (Eds.), Human growth and development, (pp. 62–84 ). Oxford: Clarendon Press.Google Scholar
  5. Bruner, J. (1983). Child’s talk. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  6. Bruner, J. S., & Sherwood, V. (1976). Peek-a-boo and the learning of rule structures. In J. Bruner, A. Jolly, & K. Sylva (Eds.), Play—Its role in development and evolution, (pp. 277–285 ). New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  7. Fischer, K. W. (1980). A theory of cognitive development: The control and construction of hierarchies of skills. Psychological Review, 87, 477–531.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gustafson, G. E., Green, J. A., & West, M. J. (1979). The infant’s changing role in mother-infant games: The growth of social skills. Infant Behavior and Development, 2, 301–308.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Harding, C. G., & Golinkoff, R. M. (1979). The origins of intentional vocalizations in prelinguistic infants. Child Development, 50, 33–40.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hubley, P., & Trevarthen, C. (1979). Sharing a task in infancy. In I. C. Uzgiris (Ed.), New Directions for Child Development (Vol. 4), Social interaction and communication during infancy, (pp. 57–80 ). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  11. Kaye, K. (1979). Thickening thin data: The maternal role in developing communication and language. In M. Bullowa (Ed.), Before speech, (pp. 191–206 ). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Killen, M., & Uzgiris, I. C. (1981). Imitation of actions with objects: The role of social meaning. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 138, 219–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Kruper, J. C., Sr Uzgiris, I. C. (1987). Fathers’ and mothers’ speech to young infants. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 16, 597–614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Leont’ev, A. N. (1981). The problem of activity in psychology. In J. V. Wertsch (Ed.), The concept of activity in Soviet psychology, (pp. 37–71 ). Armonk, NY: Sharpe.Google Scholar
  15. Malatesta, C. Z., & Haviland, J. M. (1982). Learning display rules: The socialization of emotion expression in infancy. Child Development, 53, 991–1003.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. McCabe, M., & Uzgiris, I. C. (1983). Effects of model and action on imitation in infancy. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 29, 69–82.Google Scholar
  17. McCall, R. B., Eichorn, D. H., & Hogarty, P. S. (1977). Transitions in early mental development. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 42, 3, (Serial No. 171).Google Scholar
  18. Mundy-Castle, A. (1980). Perception and communication in infancy: A cross-cultural study. In D. R. Olson (Ed.), The social foundations of language and thought, (pp. 231–253 ). New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  19. Newson, J. (1974). Towards a theory of infant understanding. Bulletin of the British Psychological Society, 27, 251–257.Google Scholar
  20. Newson, J. (1979). The growth of shared understandings between infant and caregiver. In M. Bullowa (Ed.), Before speech, (pp. 207–222 ). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Ninio, A., & Bruner, J. S. (1978). The achievement and antecedents of labelling. Journal of Child Language, 5, 1–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Papousek, H., & Papousek, M. (1977). Mothering and the cognitive head-start: Psychobiological considerations. In H. R. Schaffer (Ed.), Studies in mother-infant interaction, (pp. 63–85 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  23. PapouSek, H., & Papousek, M. (1979). Early ontogeny of human social interaction: Its biological and social dimensions. In M. von Cranach, K. Foppa, W. Lepenies, & D. Ploog (Eds.), Human ethology: Claims and limits of a new discipline, (pp. 456–478 ). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Pawlby, S. J. (1977). Imitative interaction. In H. R. Schaffer (Ed.), Studies in mother-infant interaction, (pp. 203–224 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  25. Piaget, J. (1952). The origins of intelligence in children, (M. Cook, Trans.). New York: International Universities Press. ( Original work published in 1936 )CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Piaget, J. (1970). Piaget’s theory. In P. H. Mussen (Ed.), Carmichael’s manual of child psychology, (Vol. 1, pp. 703–732 ). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  27. Piaget, J. (1976). The grasp of consciousness (S. Wedgwood, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. ( Original work published in 1974 )Google Scholar
  28. Ramer, A. L. H. (1976). The function of imitation in child language. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 19, 700–717.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. Ratner, N., & Bruner, J. S. (1978). Games, social exchange, and the acquisition of language. Journal of Child Language, 5, 391–401.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Richards, M. P. M. (Ed.). (1974). The integration of a child into a social world. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Rodgon, M. M., & Kurdek, L. A. (1977). Vocal and gestural imitation in 8-, 14-, and 20month-old children. Journal of Genetic Psychology, 131, 115–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Stern, D. N. (1977). The first relationship. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Stern, D. N. (1985). The interpersonal world of the infant. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  34. Strydom, L. M. ( 1985, April). Development of communication between African mothers and their infants in the first year of life. Paper presented at the meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Toronto, Canada.Google Scholar
  35. Trevarthen, C. (1977). Descriptive analyses of infant communicative behaviour. In H. R. Schaffer (Ed.), Studies in mother-infant interaction, (pp. 227–289 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  36. Trevarthen, C. (1980). The foundations of intersubjectivity: Development of interpersonal and cooperative understanding in infants. In D. R. Olson (Ed.), The social foundations of language and thought, (pp. 316–342 ). New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
  37. Trevarthen, C., & Hubley, P. (1978). Secondary intersubjectivity: Confidence, confiding, and acts of meaning in the first year. In A. Lock (Ed.), Action, gesture and symbol, (pp. 183–229 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  38. Tronick, E. Z. (Ed.). (1982). Social interchange in infancy. Baltimore: University Park Press.Google Scholar
  39. Uzgiris, I. C. (1976). Organization of sensorimotor intelligence. In M. Lewis (Ed.), Origins of intelligence, (pp. 123–163 ). New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Uzgiris, I. C. (Ed.). (1979). New directions for child development, Vol. 4: Social interaction and communication during infancy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  41. Uzgiris, I. C. (1981). Two functions of imitation during infancy. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 4, 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Uzgiris, I. C. ( 1983, August). Mother-infant communication during the first year of life. Paper presented at the meetings of the International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development, Munich, F. R. Germany.Google Scholar
  43. Uzgiris, I. C. (1984). Imitation in infancy: Its interpersonal aspects. In M. Perlmutter (Ed.), The Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, Vol. 17: Parent-child interactions and parent-child relations in child development, (pp. 1–32 ). Hillsdale, NJ: L. Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  44. Uzgiris, I. C., Benson, J. B., & Vasek, M. ( 1983, April). Matching behavior in mother-infant interaction. Paper presented at the meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Detroit, MI.Google Scholar
  45. Uzgiris, I. C., Vasek, M. E., & Benson, J. B. (1984). A longitudinal study of matching activity in mother-infant interaction. Paper presented at the meetings of the International Conference on Infant Studies, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  46. Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ina Č. Užgiris
    • 1
  • Janette B. Benson
    • 2
  • Jan C. Kruper
    • 1
  • Marie E. Vasek
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyClark UniversityWorcesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of DenverDenverUSA

Personalised recommendations