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Motivational Determinants of Adult Personality Functioning and Aging

  • Joel O. Raynor

Abstract

The present theoretical effort is an outgrowth of earlier conceptual analyses of the role of future orientation as a determinant of achievement-related motivation (Raynor, 1969, 1974a) and of the determinants of motivation for career striving (Raynor, 1974b). The earlier effort—to understand the determinants of immediate achievement-oriented activity—was primarily concerned with situations where immediate success/ failure is believed by the individual to determine the opportunity for subsequent striving to attain some future goal. Thus, immediate success/failure was conceived as “important” by the individual because immediate success earned the opportunity to continue and hence might lead on to future success, but immediate failure meant future failure through loss of the opportunity to continue. The conceptual analysis of such contingent path situations led to elaboration of the basic equations of theory of achievement motivation and provided a more general theory which now derives the earlier model as a special case of the more general one.

Keywords

Career Path Achievement Motivation Closed Path Future Goal Future Success 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel O. Raynor
    • 1
  1. 1.State University of New YorkBuffaloUSA

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