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Metals, Cations, and Anions

  • Bruce W. Zoecklein
  • Kenneth C. Fugelsang
  • Barry H. Gump
  • Fred S. Nury

Abstract

Grapes, musts, and to a lesser extent, wine contain trace amounts of heavy metals. The term “heavy metals” distinguishes those near the bottom of the periodic table (i.e., lead, mercury, and cadmium) and metal-like elements (such as arsenic) from the common “lighter weight” metals (such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium) present in significant amounts in grapes (see Chapter 15). Heavy metals are toxic to biological systems due to their ability to deactivate enzymes. As such, their allowable concentrations in foods is regulated. In terms of decreasing concentrations normally seen in wine, these include iron, copper, zinc, manganese, aluminum, lead, and arsenic (Table 12–1).

Keywords

White Wine Ethyl Carbamate Yeast Cell Membrane Ferric Phosphate Casse Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce W. Zoecklein
    • 1
  • Kenneth C. Fugelsang
    • 2
  • Barry H. Gump
    • 2
  • Fred S. Nury
    • 2
  1. 1.Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.California State University at FresnoUSA

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