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Industrial Districts and the Globalization of Innovation: Regions and Networks in the New Economic Space

  • Richard Gordon
Part of the Economics of Science, Technology and Innovation book series (ESTI, volume 9)

Abstract

The emergence of a new “technico-economic paradigm” [Perez (1985), Freeman (1987, 1992)] and its association with “new industrial spaces” [Scott (1988a, 1988c)] has exposed certain critical inadequacies of traditional models of regional economic growth. Theories emphasizing the static efficiency factors of regional economies elaborate an entirely proper concern for local specialization and demand-supply interdependencies, but are weakened, in an age of perpetual innovation, by their disregard for the regional bases of dynamic technological change. Export-based growth models place an appropriate stress upon external demand, and its associated local multiplier effects, as central elements in regional economic development but fail to explain either the origins of initial regional specialization or, even more importantly, how to modify or shift modes of specialization over time. Models of territorial growth based upon inter-regional movements of production factors are particularly suspect in an era when qualitative transformations in the technological bases of production serve to reinforce and compound, rather than to remove, existing assymetries between localities at the leading edge of technological change and those already far from the forefront of even the prior industrial regime. Growth strategies oriented to the in-migration of firms from elsewhere appear invalidated not only by historical experience (the generation of branch-plant economies in which extensive intra-corporate external linkages supplant, rather than reinforce, local relationships) but also by the ostensibly indigenous nature of regional high technology-based economic development34.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment High Technology Regional Innovation Industrial District High Technology Industry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Gordon
    • 1
  1. 1.Silicon Valley Research Group Center for the Study of Global TransformationsUniversity of CaliforniaSanta CruzUSA

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