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α-Guanidinoglutaric Acid and Epilepsy

  • Akitane Mori
  • Yoko Watanabe
  • Shoichiro Shindo
  • Masayuki Akagi
  • Midori Hiramatsu
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 153)

Abstract

The application of metallic cobalt to the cerebral cortex results in an experimental model of chronic focal epilepsy1,2 Many biochemical studies on this focus tissue have been performed to explore seizure mechanism3–6, though the induction phenomenon itself is not well understood.

Keywords

Glutamic Acid Glutaric Acid Metallic Cobalt Argininic Acid Sensory Motor Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akitane Mori
    • 1
  • Yoko Watanabe
    • 1
  • Shoichiro Shindo
    • 1
  • Masayuki Akagi
    • 1
  • Midori Hiramatsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurochemistry, Institute for NeurobiologyOkayama University Medical SchoolOkayama, 700Japan

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