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Hyperammonemia in the Neonate with Hypoxia

  • Yusuke Sakaguchi
  • Ken Yuge
  • Makoto Yoshino
  • Fumio Yamashita
  • Takeo Hashimoto
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 153)

Abstract

Inherited defects in enzymes of the urea cycle and those in metabolism of several organic acids and some amino acids can cause neonatal hyperammonemia (Shih, 1978). Ballard et al. (1978) described five newborns with respiratory distress who developed hyperammonemia, but exhibited normal activities of urea cycle enzymes. Similarly significant hyperammonemia in neonates has been reported (Pollack et al., 1978; Le Guennec et al., 1980). Goldberg et al. (1979) have suggested that hyperammonemia may be associated with perinatal asphyxia. These observations would indicate that such hypoxic states as respiratory distress or neonatal asphyxia can cause nonspecific transient hyperammonemia. However, there have been no studies on the relationship between hypoxia and transient hyperammonemia. The relationship between levels of blood ammonia and blood gases was studied to elucidate the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of transient hyperammonemia in neonates.

Keywords

Respiratory Distress Urea Cycle Perinatal Asphyxia Base Deficit Blood Ammonia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusuke Sakaguchi
    • 1
  • Ken Yuge
    • 1
  • Makoto Yoshino
    • 1
  • Fumio Yamashita
    • 1
  • Takeo Hashimoto
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsKurume University School of MedicineKurumeJapan
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsSt. Mary’s HospitalKurumeJapan

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