Advertisement

An Intercomparison of Sampling Devices and Analytical Techniques Using Sea Water from a CEPEX Enclosure

  • C. S. Wong
  • W. K. Johnson
  • V. Stukas
  • K. Kremling
  • H. Petersen
  • J. P. Riley
  • B. Imber
  • P. G. Berrang
  • P. Erickson
  • D. Thomas
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 9)

Abstract

An intercomparison of sampling devices was onducted using sea water at 9 m. in a plastic enclosure of 65 m3 in Saanich Inlet, B.C., Canada. The sampling methods were (i) peristaltic pumping with teflon tubing, (ii) Niskin PVC sampler, (iii) Go-Flow sampler, (iv) Close-open-close sampler, and (v) teflon-piston sampler. Sampling was conducted for 4 days: Day 1 (2 August, 1978) for mercury, Day 2 for lead, cadmium, copper, cobalt and nickel by Chelex extraction and differential pulse polarography (D.P.P.) as well as manganese by Chelex and flameless atomic absorptiometry (F.A.A.), Day 3 for lead by isotope dilution and Day 4 for cadmium, copper, iron, lead, nickel and zinc by freon extraction and F.A.A. Samples were processed in clean rooms in the shore laboratory within 30 minutes of sampling. Results indicated the feasibility of intercalibrating using the enclosure approach, the availability of chemical techniques of sufficient precision in the cases of copper, nickel, lead and cobalt for sampler intercomparison and storage tests, a problem in subsampling from the captured sea water in a sampler, and the difficulty of commonly used samplers to sample sea water in an uncontaminated way at the desired depth.

Keywords

Trace Metal Sampling Device Clean Room Ball Valve Surface Microlayer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Participants in the IDOE interlaboratory analyses workshop, 1975 (1976). Comparison determinations of lead by investigators analyzing individual samples of sea water in both their home laboratory and in an isotope dilution standardization laboratory. Marine Chemistry 4, 389–392.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Sugawara, K. (1978). Interlaboratory comparison of the determination of mercury and cadmium in sea and fresh waters. Deep-Sea Res. 25, 323–332.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Kremling, K. (1977). Report of Group 2 (Trace Metals). In: Baltic Intercalibration Workshop (7–19, March, 1977 ).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Jones, P.G.W. (1976). A preliminary report on the ICES intercalibration of sea water samples for the analysis of trace metals. ICES CM 1977/E: 16.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bewers, J.M., G. Topping and H. Windom. (1978). Status and plans regarding ICES intercalibrations for trace metals in sea water. ICES CM 1978/E: 27.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bewers, J.M., P.A. Yeats, J. Dalziel and J.L. Baron (1979). Report of the fourth round intercalibration for trace metals in sea water. ICES CM 1979/E: 37.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wong, C.S., W.K. Johnson, and V.J. Stukas (Unpublished manuscript): Storage study of sea water for trace metals.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Schaule, B. and C.C. Patterson (1978). The occurrence of lead in the Northeast Pacific, and the effects of anthropogenic inputs. In: M. Branic (Editor), Proceedings of an international expert discussion on lead: “Occurrence, fate and pollution in the marine environment”; Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Centre of Marine Research, Rovinj. Oct. 1977, Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Patterson, C.C. and D.M. Settle (1976). The reduction of orders of magnitude errors in lead analysis. In: P.D. La Fleur (Editor). “Accuracy in Trace Analysis: Sampling, Sample Handing, Analysis.” NBS Special Publication 422, 321–363.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Boyle. E., J.M. Edmond (1975). Copper in surface waters south of New Zealand. Nature 253, 107–109.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Boyle, E., F. Sclater and J.M. Edmond (1976). On the marine geochemistry of cadmium. Nature 263, 42–44.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bruland, K.W., G.A. Knauer and J.H. Martin (1978). Zinc in northeast Pacific water. Nature 271, 741–743.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Menzel, D.M. and J. Case (1977). Concept and design: controlled ecosystem pollution experiment. Bull. Mar. Sci., 27, 1–7.Google Scholar
  14. Bothner, M.H. and D.E. Robertson (1975). Mercury contamination of sea water samples stored in poloyethylene containers. Anal. Chem. 47, 592–595.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Stukas, V.J. and C.S. Wong. Stable lead isotopes as a tracer in coastal waters. Science 211, 1424–1427Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Wong, C.S., K. Kremling, J.P. Riley, W.K. Johnson, V. Stukas, P.G. Berrang, P. Erickson, D. Thorns, H. Petersen and B. Imber (1979). Accurate Measurement of trace metals in sea water: an intercomparison of sampling devices and analytical techniques using CEPEX enclosure of sea water. Unpublished manuscript report, NATO study funded by NATO Scientific Affairs Division.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Abdullah M.I., O.A. el-Rayis and J.P. Riley (1976). Re-assessment of chelating ion-exchange resins for trace metal analysis of sea water. Anal. Chimica Acta 84, 363–368.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Abdullah, M.I. and L.G. Royale (1972). The determination of copper, lead, cadmium, nickel, zinc and cobalt in natural waters by pulse polarography. Anal.Chim. Acta. 58Google Scholar
  19. Danielsson, L.G., B. Magnusson and S. Westerlund (1978). An improved metal extraction procedure for the determination of trace metals in sea water by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization. Anal. Chimica Acta. 98, 47–57.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Wong
    • 2
  • W. K. Johnson
    • 2
  • V. Stukas
    • 2
  • K. Kremling
    • 3
  • H. Petersen
    • 3
  • J. P. Riley
    • 4
  • B. Imber
    • 4
  • P. G. Berrang
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Erickson
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. Thomas
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Ocean Chemistry DivisionInstitute of Ocean SciencesSidneyCanada
  2. 2.Ocean Chemistry Division contract to SEAKEM Oceanography Ltd.SidneyCanada
  3. 3.Marine Chemistry DepartmentInstitut für Meereskunde and der Universität, KielKielF.R. Germany
  4. 4.Department of OceanographyUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

Personalised recommendations