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Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis in Uremic Diabetics

  • Elias V. Balaskas
  • Dimitrios G. Oreopoulos

Abstract

During the last 15 years, there has been an impressive increase in the number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to diabetic nephropathy[1]. Diabetic nephropathy has become the leading cause of ESRD in such countries as United States, Canada, Japan, Scandinavia and much of Western Europe, accounting for 30% of new patients and 26% of U.S. dialysis and transplant patients[2,3]. In the recent USRDS 1997-Annual Data Report, 37.4% of total treated ESRD patients for 1991 to 1995 years are diabetics with an incidence of 94 patients/million pop./ year and a prevalence of 274 patients /million pop/year, for 1993 to 1995 years[4]. Hemodialysis (HD), continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and renal transplantation are standard therapies for these patients. Despite encouraging results with renal transplantation which offers a better quality of life and perhaps longer survival than dialysis[5,6] the majority are treated with dialysis, mainly because of the advanced age of most diabetics and the lack of kidney donors. When transplantation is not available or is not medically feasible, dialysis therapy becomes inevitable for many of these patients while waiting for renal transplant. The choice of dialysis therapy depends on such factors as nephrologist’s bias, existence of comorbid disease treatment availability and other medical and social factors[2].

Keywords

Diabetic Nephropathy Peritoneal Dialysis Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Uremic Patient Residual Renal Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elias V. Balaskas
    • 1
  • Dimitrios G. Oreopoulos
    • 1
  1. 1.Peritoneal Dialysis Unit, The Toronto HospitalUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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