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Baking around the world

  • John T. Gould

Abstract

Why is it that ‘bread’ means different things in different parts of the world? Place a loaf of white North American pan bread beside a loaf of Central European rye bread, Middle Eastern pita bread or Chinese steam bread and it could justifiably be said that they are all quite different products. Yet they are all bread. Why do bakers in different parts of the world use quite different equipment to make the same, or almost same, product?

Keywords

White Bread Cereal Chemist Dough Development Work Input Potassium Bromate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • John T. Gould

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