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The Catheter

  • Grannum R. Sant
  • Edwin M. MearesJr.

Abstract

Urinary catheters are widely used to manage urinary tract obstruction and incontinence, facilitate surgical repair of the genitourinary tract, provide access to the upper urinary tract (kidneys and ureters), and monitor urine output. Indwelling urethral catheters are an important cause of hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infection. In his landmark editorial, “The Case Against the Catheter,” Beeson (1), emphasized the morbidity of catheterization and stressed that “the decision to use this instrument should be made with the knowledge that it involves the risk of producing a serious disease which is often difficult to treat.” This editorial initially led to widespread and unfounded fears of catheterization. A redefinition of the indications for catheterization and a flurry of research aimed at reducing the catheter-associated morbidity then followed.

Keywords

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy Urethral Catheter Intermittent Catheterization Ureteral Stents Clean Intermittent Catheterization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grannum R. Sant
    • 1
  • Edwin M. MearesJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Tufts University School of Medicine and New England Medical Center HospitalsBostonUSA

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